ALL IN FOR HER

ALL IN FOR HER

Behind every great woman is another. And another. And another. It’s time to come together and go all in for her.

Donors

Giving big and being bold takes courage. It takes passion. And the personal breakthrough for our donors has created
a lasting impact for many women and girls.
Learn more about donating >

  • Barbara Dobkin
    Barbara Dobkin

    Barbara Dobkin

    Gender has always been important to me. I grew up in the 50’s and experienced gender inequality in my everyday life. Too many people believe women’s issues no longer need support. While nothing could be further from the truth, this translated into a major funding crisis for organizations that work to empower women and girls.

    We can’t just sit back and wait for change to happen. Women must step into our donor leadership and call on others to join us.

    My gift:
    In 1993, I made my first gift to establish Mayan, a feminist organization to act as a catalyst for change for women in the Jewish community. That gift unleashed the power of my philanthropy.

  • Carol Andreae
    Carol Andreae

    Carol Andreae

    As a life coach and career counselor, I worked with women about their relationships with money. Maybe, I thought, some of my concerns about money were ones that were holding others back, and by taking a public stand on my philanthropy, I could encourage others to do the same.

    By announcing my gift, I was able to have a larger impact. While it meant breaking family taboo, it allowed me to step into my own power in ways I didn’t expect.

    My gift:
    I made my BIG + BOLD pledge to the Women’s Fund of Central Ohio. Its mission is to transform the lives of women and girls by mobilizing the collective power and passion of all women working together.

  • Mona Sinha
    Mona Sinha

    Mona Sinha

    Anonymous financial support enabled me to have a transformational education at Smith College. I’ve always wanted to thank those donors in person and learn what motivated them to support women from India, but I understood their decision to give anonymously.

    When I joined Women Moving Millions, I saw the value of activating my voice and influence for the issues I am passionate about. You can’t inspire others by being quiet.

    My gift:
    In 2010, I made my BIG + BOLD pledge in support of educating women to be leaders. Part of that gift went to Apne Aap whose mission is to increase choices for at-risk girls and women in order to ensure access to their rights.

  • Mary Tidlund
    Mary Tidlund

    Mary Tidlund

    If someone asked me five years ago what it meant to give with a gender lens, I would have assumed it meant giving only to “women’s issues.” I used to focus my work and my giving more traditionally, more broadly. I wanted to help everyone. I’ve since come to understand that every issue is a women’s issue.

    If we want to have an impact in health, education and poverty alleviation, we must integrate women and girls.

    My gift:
    In 1998 I founded the Mary A. Tidlund Charitable Foundation. My BIG + BOLD gift came from my community and went to funding our organization’s work globally in health education and the alleviation of poverty.

  • Maria Nunez
    Maria Nunez

    Maria Nunez

    My childhood was challenging, but amazing people touched my life. I was transformed from a fearful girl with no self-esteem into a determined and passionate woman who changed the course of her life.

    I have never considered myself wealthy. I didn’t really understand my own capacity to make a BIG + bold gift. I made a gift that is financially challenging for me because the need is so great. Now is the time to create lasting change.

    My gift:
    I made my BIG + BOLD gift to the Global Fund for Women. Its mission is to advance the rights of women and girls worldwide by increasing resources for and investing in women-led organizations and women’s collective leadership for change.

  • Demi Moore
    Demi Moore

    Demi Moore

    My eyes and heart were opened to the issues of sex trafficking almost eight years ago when I saw a documentary about children who were forced into sex slavery in Cambodia. I was horrified and I knew I couldn’t live in a world in which this was taking place without doing something about it.

    I knew I wanted to work on the issue of child sex trafficking, but I wanted to figure out what specifically I could do to aid and reinforce this important movement.

    My gift:
    I made my BIG + BOLD gift to Thorn when I co-founded the organization in 2009 and have since supported the work.

Impact

The case for gender equality is a matter of common sense. The more we invest in women and girls, the more they invest back into their
families and communities, propelling social and economic advancement. See more proof.

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I'm going ALL IN FOR HER because:

Overview Flat feet plague many Americans and perhaps one of the worst times to have fallen arches is the winter holiday season. Why? Many people are destined to spend hours standing in line waiting to pay for holiday gifts, see Santa or mail holiday cards and packages. There are also those cocktail parties, holiday caroling sessions and strolls through the Christmas lights that will undoubtedly have people on their feet for long stretches of time too. Causes Flat feet in adults can appear for a number of reasons. Arches never developed properly. Damage to the tendons that support the arch. Damage or inflammation of the posterior tibial tendon which runs from your lower leg, down and across your ankle, and connects to the middle of the arch. Trauma involving broken bones in the foot. Rheumatoid arthritis. Aging, pregnancy, nerve damage, obesity or even diabetes. Symptoms Having flat feet can be painless and is actually normal in some people. But others with flat feet experience pain in the heel or arch area, difficulty standing on tiptoe, or have swelling along the inside of the ankle. They may also experience pain after standing for long periods of time or playing sports. Some back problems can also be attributed to flat feet. Diagnosis An examination of the foot is enough for the health care provider to diagnose flat foot. However, the cause must be determined. If an arch develops when the patient stands on his or her toes, the flat foot is called flexible and no treatment or further work-up is necessary. If there is pain associated with the foot or if the arch does not develop with toe-standing, x-rays are necessary. If a tarsal coalition is suspected, a CT scan is often ordered. If a posterior tibial tendon injury is suspected, your health care provider may recommend an MRI. Non Surgical Treatment Treatment of flat feet really depends on how far the damage has progressed. Conservative treatments often include immobilization (often by cast or brace) to reduce inflammation. Your doctor may also recommend anti-inflammatory medication (like ibuprofen) to get your inflamed tendon to calm down a bit. Orthotics can also offer significant relief. If these treatments fail to significantly improve symptoms, then surgery may be your best option to get the structure of your body back Where are the femur tibia and fibula? it needs to be. Your podiatrist can discuss surgical options with you in great depth. Surgical Treatment Feet that do not respond to the treatments above may need surgery. The surgery will help to create a supportive arch. Prevention Flat feet or Fallen Arches cannot be prevented due to congenital of nature or from underlying disease process; however, painful symptoms and future pathology from Flat Feet or Fallen Arches may be prevented by the following. Continue to wear your orthotics for work and exercise to provide stability and maintain function of your feet. Footwear. Continue to wear supportive shoes to maximise the function of your orthotic and prevent excessive movement of the joints in your feet. After Care Time off work depends on the type of work as well as the surgical procedures performed. . A patient will be required to be non-weight bearing in a cast or splint and use crutches for four to twelve weeks. Usually a patient can return to work in one to two weeks if they are able to work while seated. If a person's job requires standing and walking, return to work may take several weeks. Complete recovery may take six months to a full year. Complications can occur as with all surgeries, but are minimized by strictly following your surgeon's post-operative instructions. The main complications include infection, bone that is slow to heal or does not heal, progression or reoccurrence of deformity, a stiff foot, and the need for further surgery. Many of the above complications can be avoided by only putting weight on the operative foot when allowed by your surgeon.
What Are Fallen Arches
July 17, 2017

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